Christine Thomsen-Raasch
My works are meditations on the truth and devotional beauty found in nature. When I look beyond the human detritus of electronics and greed-driven lifestyles, God reveals Himself to me through environmental peace. By portraying the beautiful imagery of rural Wisconsin I recall a time of American values; a time when family and neighbors worked and prayed together. Barns are lasting testaments of the rewards of hard work and are not only striking, but are ineffable symbols of our agrarian past. I work primarily with acrylic paint because of its permanence and color fastness, qualities which marry greatly with the perpetuity of my subject matter.

Christine Thomsen-Raasch earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Studio Art from Cardinal Stritch University but considers herself largely self-taught. “Institutions taught me art had to be buyer-centered and grandiose. Essentially, She embraced the moral imperatives She had taught herself. There is no definitive paradigm for judging art. Artists must create for themselves in a manner which copiously explores their spirit.” For Christine, nature provided the great inspiration she needed. The quietude and peace of the land is a guide to faith contemplation and a door to spiritual repose. Often pursuing traditional miniature dimensions for her works facilitates the simplification of her hopes. She is able to block out what she no longer wishes to see to instead focus in detail on a single, emotive instant of the American scene.
Christine has received several awards and honors for her work, most recently earning Grand Prize in the Waukesha County Courthouse Art Purchase Award Competition. She’s also received the Art in Action Dry Media Award through the Art Guild of Menomonee Falls, as well as Honorable Mentions, Peoples’ Choice and Artist Community awards through the Waukesha Creative Arts League, the Spring Creek Art at the Creek Exhibition, and Menomonee Falls Art in Action Exhibition. Now an artist in her thirties, she continues to enjoy rendering barns and landscapes, but finds the truest gratification in the simple, pure act of creating art.